World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers


career coaching

Helping women create plans for their future media careers, developing plans to get them there and promoting leadership skills – these tasks are part and parcel for those acting as coaches within WAN-IFRA’s Women In News (WIN) programme, now in its sixth year.

Author

Hedvig Lundstrom's picture

Hedvig Lundstrom

Date

2016-06-22 15:33

There was a time when Faith Oneya would enter the newsroom unnoticed. After quietly going about her day’s work, she would slip out the door and head home. Some might have described her as shy or even lacking in confidence. But that was then.

Author

Hedvig Lundstrom's picture

Hedvig Lundstrom

Date

2016-06-22 15:21

Women in News works with newspapers and their high-potential female employees to overcome the gender gap in management and senior editorial positions. It does so by equipping programme participants with sustainable strategies, skills and support networks to advance their careers and contribute to the growth of strong local media enterprises. In 2014 Women in News will run in Botswana, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe, reaching more than 60 media professionals from more than 30 news media companies throughout Southern Africa. For the first time, WAN-IFRA will partner with member association Print and Digital Media South Africa as well as the South African Editor's Forum to bring the programme to South Africa.

Author

Andrew Heslop's picture

Andrew Heslop

Date

2012-11-12 13:18

Possibly the most impactful and pivitol aspect of WAN-IFRA's Women In News (WIN) programme is career coaching. In order to assist participants from Botswana, Namibia an Zambia in developing their career roadmaps - detailed five-year plans for professional growth within the media industry - two international career coaches have been actively involved since WIN's July launch; engaging WIN women regularly in person and over the phone.

Author

Andrew Heslop's picture

Andrew Heslop

Date

2011-01-14 17:42

Syndicate content